Implementing a design system across a microservice architecture

I’m sure you’ve read lots of posts online about how to build design systems and discussions about front-end methodologies, I’ve even written one myself. However, my role as a software engineer is not only to build a well-structured design system and pattern library. It is also to ensure it’s implemented in the right way across all of our systems and products. I’ve built a few different design systems now, all on different scales and in this post I will share how I like to implement design systems across several different products in a microservice architecture. »

Atomic Design at Zuto

At Zuto we’ve recently redesigned our website and application form and are continuing to redesign most of the other customer facing services we have. Previously, we had a very disjointed UX across the site and this was simply because we didn’t have any real design standards or guidelines to follow. Starting again has provided us with the opportunity to put these standards and guidelines in place, so it’s clear to everyone in the business how we build our user interfaces and enable us to create a consistent UX across all of our services. »

Generating multiple static HTML pages with Gulp and Handlebars

Creating a static HTML pages is easy. Creating multiple copies of that same web page manually and changing content is again easy, however this creates a maintenance overhead. Any web developer will understand how frustrating it can be when you’re working on a project and there is that one part that you keep putting off until you absolutely have to because it’s so laborious and painstaking to complete. While working on a project recently at work I was faced with this exact problem. »